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Rio Pipeline 2019
(3/9/2019 - 5/9/2019)
Ventro de Convenções Sul América, Cidade Nova, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
IBP - Instituto Brasileiro de Petróleo, Gás e Biocombustíveis
Horários:
Congresso: 9h às 18h30
Exposição: 12h às 20h

Idiomas:Português e Inglês

 
 
Atena Engenharia Leia as histórias do Netinho (nosso mascote) Acesse a nossa seção e saiba tudo sobre GNV Leia as histórias do Netinho (nosso mascote)
  Produção - Novidades Tecnológicas
  Autor/Fonte: U.S. Department of Energy/PennEnergy Petro
  Data: 18/05/2012

    Field trial to safely extract steady flow of natural gas from methane hydrates successful


U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced early May the completion of a successful, unprecedented test of technology in the North Slope of Alaska that was able to safely extract a steady flow of natural gas from methane hydrates – a vast, entirely untapped resource that holds enormous potential for U.S. economic and energy security. Building upon this initial, small-scale test, the Department is launching a new research effort to conduct a long-term production test in the Arctic as well as research to test additional technologies that could be used to locate, characterize and safely extract methane hydrates on a larger scale in the U.S. Gulf Coast.

“The Energy Department’s long term investments in shale gas research during the 70s and 80s helped pave the way for today’s boom in domestic natural gas production that is projected to cut the cost of natural gas by 30 percent by 2025 while creating thousands of American jobs,” said Secretary Chu. “While this is just the beginning, this research could potentially yield significant new supplies of natural gas.”

What are Methane Hydrates?

Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside, and are found both onshore and offshore – including under the Arctic permafrost and in ocean sediments along nearly every continental shelf in the world. The substance looks remarkably like white ice, but it does not behave like ice. When methane hydrate is “melted,” or exposed to pressure and temperature conditions outside those where it is stable, the solid crystalline lattice turns to liquid water, and the enclosed methane molecules are released as gas.

Successful Field Test on the Alaska North Slope

The Department of Energy has partnered with ConocoPhillips and the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation to conduct a test of natural gas extraction from methane hydrate using a unique production technology, developed through laboratory collaboration between the University of Bergen, Norway, and ConocoPhillips. This ongoing, proof-of-concept test commenced on February 15, 2012, and concluded on April 10. The team injected a mixture of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen into the formation, and demonstrated that this mixture could promote the production of natural gas. Ongoing analyses of the extensive datasets acquired at the field site will be needed to determine the efficiency of simultaneous CO2 storage in the reservoirs.

This test was the first ever field trial of a methane hydrate production methodology whereby CO2 was exchanged in situ with the methane molecules within a m

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